MANILA FAME 2015

Design Philippines successfully established its presence at the recently concluded Euroluce at the Salone Internazionale del Mobile 2013. The participation was the first ever for the Philippines with top designers Antonio “Budji” Layug and Kenneth Cobonpue leading the contigency of six companies that included Cobonpue’s HIVE, Industria, Mayumi by CSM Philippines, Schema by Kalikasan Crafts, Tadeco Home by Tadeco Inc., and Triboa Bay Living by Vivere Lifestyles Co. The participation showcased the best of the Philippines creative industry, presenting sustainable design sensibilities through the use of indigenous materials. Top-of-the-line lighting concepts featured were a merge of the traditional and the modern, paying due deference to the craftsmanship roots of Philippine design and highlighting the continuous evolution of the Art of the Craftsman to a more global movement that ultimately culminates into Design Philippines. The success of Design Philippines at Euroluce can be spelled in the great number of buyer response by way of generated sales during the course of the five-day event. Buyers from Europe, North and South America, Asia, and Australia crowded the Philippi...
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Design Philippines successfully established its presence at the recently concluded Euroluce at the Salone Internazionale del Mobile 2013. The participation was the first ever for the Philippines with top designers Antonio “Budji” Layug and Kenneth Cobonpue leading the contigency of six companies that included Cobonpue’s HIVE, Industria, Mayumi by CSM Philippines, Schema by Kalikasan Crafts, Tadeco Home by Tadeco Inc., and Triboa Bay Living by Vivere Lifestyles Co. The participation showcased the best of the Philippines creative industry, presenting sustainable design sensibilities through the use of indigenous materials. Top-of-the-line lighting concepts featured were a merge of the traditional and the modern, paying due deference to the craftsmanship roots of Philippine design and highlighting the continuous evolution of the Art of the Craftsman to a more global movement that ultimately culminates into Design Philippines. The success of Design Philippines at Euroluce can be spelled in the great number of buyer response by way of generated sales during the course of the five-day event. Buyers from Europe, North and South America, Asia, and Australia crowded the Philippine booth, a tell-tale sign that Design Philippines is doing its job in reaching more buyers in a bigger, global scale. Among the key buyers who were keen on Philippine-crafted products were top companies of Forestier and Roche Bobois (France), Pamalux (Austria), Alessi (Italy), Leone Design (Australia), Philips (The Netherlands), and Zaneen and Julien Armand (Canada). As far as media interest goes, the Philippines participation was a success with Design Philippines generating quite the posit
ive buzz and catching the interests of publications such as Interni and Marie Claire Maison. The participation also paved a partnership with the Italian Architects Association agreeing to present an Italian design showcase in Manila FAME’s March 2014 show next year. With the momentum from Euroluce 2013, plans of bring Design Philippines to Maison et Objet, Europe’s largest design exhibition, are being set in motion, so expect to see more of Philippine design and craftsmanship making connections in the European market. Don’t forget to save the dates of the upcoming Manila FAME, 17 – 20 October 2013 at the SMX Convention Center, Mall of Asia Complex, Metro Manila, Philippines.

Design Philippines to Euroluce: Bringing the Art of the Craftsman to Milan

Milan – April 22, 2013 - Filipino world-class artistry and craftsmanship under the unified brand of "Design Philippines" took the global spotlight at the Euroluce International Lighting Exhibition held on 9-14 April 2013 in Milan, Italy. At Euroluce, the global benchmark for the lighting industry, Design Philippines presents 100% design and craftsmanship, organized by the Department of Trade and Industry’s Center for International Expositions and Missions (DTI-CITEM), brings together six of the Philippine’s best manufacturers and taps renowned designers Antonio “Budji” Layug and Kenneth Cobonpue displayed their innovatively designed lamps and other lighting fixtures, complemented with home furniture and decors in the first-ever country pavilion at this major lighting exhibition and lead the participation. Participating companies include Kenneth Cobonpue’s HIVE, Industria, Mayumi by CSM Philippines, Schema by Kalikasan Crafts, Tadeco Home by Tadeco Inc., and Triboa Bay Living by Vivere Lifestyles Co. Tadeco Home creates lamps and home accents made of abaca and banana fibers intricately woven by skilled artisans using traditional techniques, bringing the past...
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Milan – April 22, 2013 - Filipino world-class artistry and craftsmanship under the unified brand of "Design Philippines" took the global spotlight at the Euroluce International Lighting Exhibition held on 9-14 April 2013 in Milan, Italy. At Euroluce, the global benchmark for the lighting industry, Design Philippines presents 100% design and craftsmanship, organized by the Department of Trade and Industry’s Center for International Expositions and Missions (DTI-CITEM), brings together six of the Philippine’s best manufacturers and taps renowned designers Antonio “Budji” Layug and Kenneth Cobonpue displayed their innovatively designed lamps and other lighting fixtures, complemented with home furniture and decors in the first-ever country pavilion at this major lighting exhibition and lead the participation. Participating companies include Kenneth Cobonpue’s HIVE, Industria, Mayumi by CSM Philippines, Schema by Kalikasan Crafts, Tadeco Home by Tadeco Inc., and Triboa Bay Living by Vivere Lifestyles Co. Tadeco Home creates lamps and home accents made of abaca and banana fibers intricately woven by skilled artisans using traditional techniques, bringing the past into the present. Tadeco Home has evolved from a community development program of Tagum Agricultural Development Co. Inc., a banana exporter in the Philippines. It sources all its raw materials from its own plantation. Hive is a collective of designers and artisans producing lighting and home accessories under the creative direction of Kenneth Cobonpue and management of Celso Advincula Jr. Using innovative handmade production techniques and organic materials, the design house comes up with n
ew collections every year from various designers around the globe. Industria romanticizes steel, tempers it to evoke lightness, grace and sophistication in its design. The company, whose creations bring fantasy to form and function, was borne out of the creative collaboration of Jude Tiotuico and Eric Paras. The result is a delightful and deceptively whimsical collection of furniture, exuding elegance by its scale, form and creative manipulation of materials. Mayumi (by CSM Philippines, Inc.) is committed to creating exquisite objects made of fine bone china. All of our products are made by hand, skillfully crafted by artisans who, with years of experience and expertise, are passionate about maintaining its characteristic of quiet beauty and elegance. By using porcelain clay and recycled animal bone ash, Mayumi’s bone china is delicate, luminous, and exceptionally strong, all the qualities of genuine fine bone china. Triboa Bay Living is a lifestyle brand that marries tradition with a pared-down contemporary sensibility. Wood is ingeniously transformed into elegant lighting and furniture pieces that evoke a warm, casual and resort-like ambience. With some pieces counterpointed in steel components in industrial forms, its design ranges from rectilinear and modern to traditional French and English country. Triboa Bay Living’s products are sold to resort contractors, furniture retailers and interior decorators from Europe, Africa, Australia, South America, and Asia. Schema by Kalikasan crafts, uses metal wire as its only medium, the transformation process for each product is done by hand, resulting in distinct lines formed with the highest level of artisanshi
p. The "Design Philippines" pavilion attracted visitors and buyers from Italy and other countries from Europe, North America and Asia. The display also drew the attention of the local and foreign media, with interviews by fashion and design magazines like Marie Claire and Interni. The Philippine pavilion also offered buyers and visitors a glimpse of Manila F.A.M.E. (Furnishings and Apparel Manufacturers' Exchange) International, the country’s bi-annual trade show organized by CITEM. Close to 300,000 visitors from more than 140 countries were reported to have participated at Euroluce 2013, which also was held side by side with the Salone Internazionale del Mobile in the same fair grounds in Milan. (sources: www.philcongenmilan.net - www.citem.gov.ph) Source: http://www.akoaypilipino.eu/komunidad/komunidad/kinatawan-at-panayam/design-philippines-to-euroluce-bringing-the-art-of-the-craftsman-to-milan.html

Design Philippines to Euroluce: Bringing the Art of the Craftsman to Milan

It is undeniable that Philippine design is on the upsurge. With the abundant potential in creativity, craftsmanship, and design in the Philippines, it is no wonder that the world has taken notice and is seeking more. To its advantage, the Philippines is plentiful in natural resources and indigenous materials used in many forms of craftsmanship. Deeply rooted in tradition, craftsmanship has paved the way to today’s Philippine design, seamlessly merging heritage, modernity, ingenuity, and creativity. The talents in the country are certainly world-class with designers working side by side with craftsmen in creating products that carry the country’s distinct brand of Design Philippines. Design Philippines is a movement on the rise. It represents the continuous evolution of the Art of the Craftsman through a more worldly perspective, translating yet preserving craftsmanship into contemporary designs that utilizes natural and indigenous materials. Moving towards bringing more of Philippine design and craftsmanship to the world, Design Philippines takes the Art of the Craftsman to iSaloni Euroluce, International Lighting Exhibition, on 9 – 14 April 2013 in Milan, Italy. At Eur...
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It is undeniable that Philippine design is on the upsurge. With the abundant potential in creativity, craftsmanship, and design in the Philippines, it is no wonder that the world has taken notice and is seeking more. To its advantage, the Philippines is plentiful in natural resources and indigenous materials used in many forms of craftsmanship. Deeply rooted in tradition, craftsmanship has paved the way to today’s Philippine design, seamlessly merging heritage, modernity, ingenuity, and creativity. The talents in the country are certainly world-class with designers working side by side with craftsmen in creating products that carry the country’s distinct brand of Design Philippines. Design Philippines is a movement on the rise. It represents the continuous evolution of the Art of the Craftsman through a more worldly perspective, translating yet preserving craftsmanship into contemporary designs that utilizes natural and indigenous materials. Moving towards bringing more of Philippine design and craftsmanship to the world, Design Philippines takes the Art of the Craftsman to iSaloni Euroluce, International Lighting Exhibition, on 9 – 14 April 2013 in Milan, Italy. At Euroluce, the global benchmark for the lighting industry, Design Philippines presents 100% design and craftsmanship. The Center for International Trade Expositions and Missions (CITEM) brings together six of the country’s best manufacturers and taps renowned designers Antonio “Budji” Layug and Kenneth Cobonpue to lead the participation. Participating companies include Kenneth Cobonpue’s HIVE, Industria, Mayumi by CSM Philippines, Schema by Kalikasan Crafts, Tadeco Home by Tadeco Inc., an
d Triboa Bay Living by Vivere Lifestyles Co. As Design Philippines sets out to represent the country in Euroluce through exquisitely designed and crafted export products, don’t forget to mark your calendars for the upcoming 58th edition of Manila FAME, Asia’s Design and Lifestyle Event, 17 – 20 October 2013 at the SMX Convention Center, Metro Manila, Philippines. For more information on the Philippine participation at Euroluce, visit www.citem.com.ph/euroluce2013. The Philippine booth is located at Pavilion 13, H16 at the Milan Fairgrounds, Rho, Milan, Italy. Source: https://manilafame.wordpress.com/2013/04/04/design-philippines-to-euroluce-bringing-the-art-of-the-craftsman-to-milan/

Now, they’re designing furniture and accessories for the ‘millennials’

Move over, baby boomers: At the recent Manila FAME, the new generation of condo-dwelling, jet-setting young home owners was the obvious target market Trend is a dangerous word,” declared James Booth, project director of the recent Manila FAME (Furnishings and Apparel Manufacturers’ Exchange). This year, the trade show, organized by  the Center for International Trade Expositions and Missions (Citem), is directing its efforts to the younger population and the collaboration of young designers with established manufacturers. “One of the things that Manila FAME does a very good job with is that it stays with the macro trend. The whole change of demographic is a real thing,” said Booth. “The approach to marketing changes. Those are trends. When you get down to a product trend, you have to be very careful in how that is translated.” He added: “A perfect example is the Design for Export Program under the auspices of Citem. It puts together a young designer with a qualified exporter and concentrates on the creation of a new product. That is what is important, not because black is ‘in’ this season and orange is ‘in’ next season.” Booth explained that, at th...
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Move over, baby boomers: At the recent Manila FAME, the new generation of condo-dwelling, jet-setting young home owners was the obvious target market Trend is a dangerous word,” declared James Booth, project director of the recent Manila FAME (Furnishings and Apparel Manufacturers’ Exchange). This year, the trade show, organized by  the Center for International Trade Expositions and Missions (Citem), is directing its efforts to the younger population and the collaboration of young designers with established manufacturers. “One of the things that Manila FAME does a very good job with is that it stays with the macro trend. The whole change of demographic is a real thing,” said Booth. “The approach to marketing changes. Those are trends. When you get down to a product trend, you have to be very careful in how that is translated.” He added: “A perfect example is the Design for Export Program under the auspices of Citem. It puts together a young designer with a qualified exporter and concentrates on the creation of a new product. That is what is important, not because black is ‘in’ this season and orange is ‘in’ next season.” Booth explained that, at the turn of the 21st century, the consumer market is forked toward both the boomer sunset and the “millennial” sunrise. He quoted statistics as saying that, as of January 2012, the millennials (ages 18-40) now outnumber the boomers. As of January, 10,000 baby boomers in the US are turning 65 every day for the next 20 years.  “It means that the consumer that we have relied upon for the last 30 years is going into retirement. They’re living in a different way—fixed incomes, downsizing
from a three- and  four-bedroom home to a two-bedroom condominium. “At the same time, the new generation, the millennials, are skyrocketing in numbers. They have reached their highest years of earning and spending powers. In their lifetimes they will spend over US$10 trillion,” said Booth. “We can’t afford, as the saying goes, to ‘throw the baby out with the bath water.’ We’ve got to continue to market to the aging baby boomer. How do they live? What are the products that connect to them?” Luis “Budji” Layug, one of Manila FAME’s creative directors, added: “The millennials are successful early in their careers. Since they travel a lot, they like to get things all over the world to represent how they feel and how they live. They like unusual lines.  There’s more outdoor living. They like to associate themselves with designers.” Old and new   On the choice of Manila FAME’s creative directors—which includes Kenneth Cobonpue—Citem executive director Rosvi Gaetos, said: “In home design, there’s nobody like Budji (Layug). He’s got experience and he knows directions in home design, how Filipino artisanship should match what the market needs.  He’s got the world view and maturity to deal with different taste levels of millennials. In marketing and business partnership, Kenneth guides the young designers.” Gaetos added: “The PH Philippines, the new positioning of Design Philippines, is purely Kenneth’s. It is the equivalent of Movement 8 which has established a legacy. Kenneth and Budji are bridging the gap.” Booth pointed out that the Millennial Home and Design Philippines exhibit areas featured a mix of products gear
ed toward both the boomers and the millennials, with emphasis on the new and bolder aesthetics skewed to the new consumers. Citing Layug’s classic, the half-moon bamboo sofa, which was designed over 20 years ago, Booth explained: “It still is relevant for the baby boomer consumer who has a second home. No millennial could have the space to have that.” One of  Manila FAME’s directions was the crossover between tradition and modernity. For instance, in Layug’s setting, the streamlined four-poster bed and bench paid homage to Betis Crafts’ marquetry. Booth also noted Layug’s modern take on the wingback chair, which was executed by Pacific Traders. “It’s a chair that my mother grew up with, sat in and loved. Budji kept the basic form and transformed it for a much younger outlook with the use of  wicker, so that it could be used outdoors. He took both approaches which again is a very millennial concept. The inside can go outside and the outside can go outside,” said Booth.  Partnering with Betis Crafts, Ito Kish also gave the traditional solihiya or cane backing a contemporary look through its different uses and lighter woods such as rattan, mahogany and ipil for outdoor furniture. “I wanted to explore its flexibility,” he said. Normally used in chairs, the solihiya was interpreted in dividers, cabinets, lighting fixtures, chairs and tables and cubes in geometric shapes. He also played with the regional weaving patterns by mixing and matching them. The traditional craft looked so fresh that he won the Next One Now Design Award for Best Design Furniture in the transitional category, and his booth won for Best Visual Merchandising. Cebuano de
signer Vito Selma paid tribute to the wicker peacock chair by using its base as a pendant lamp. “I gave it a modern twist with a triangle design inside,” he added. Eco trend   In keeping with the eco trend, Vito Selma recycled the wood waste from the furniture factory of his parents and transformed it into tables. Selma’s dining table of chipped wood was stunning for its unusual form. Likewise, the other wood wastes were cut into little squares, sandblasted for texture and individually hand inlaid to make a mosaic coffee table. Selma employed banig as upholstery for his modern, lightweight sofa. “The millennials are product and materials conscious. Everything is natural and the proportions are smaller. The furniture can’t be too heavy. I kept the sofa slim and and light,” he added. For Catalina Embroideries of Cebu, which exports pillows, lampshades, mirrors and chairs, Selma designed a collection inspired by native animals. He made lamps from natural fibers that were a reference to the Philippine eagle. The pillowcases were made of coconut that mimicked the patterns of the cobra and the crocodile. Booth cited how the young designers made traditional materials exciting. French-Filipino textile artist Olivia D’Aboville reworks the t’nalak supplied by Tadeco by making them into lamps that looked like sea creatures. Tagaytay-based Japanese designer Wataru Sakuma blended his country’s aesthetics with buri in making hanging and stackable lamps. Produced by Hacienda Crafts, the lamps were shaped from a single sheet of buri that was folded to create a three-dimensional zigzag patterns. “The lamp collection was inspired by origami and T’boli weavi
ng patterns,” said Sakuma. “They are perfect millennial products. The millennial consumer would stack three lamps at the end of their sofa and put a piece of glass on top. The lamp becomes a side table. It’s multifunctional because they don’t have the space to do what the baby boomers would have done traditionally,” said Booth.  Making his foray into industrial design, Filipino-Chinese artist Leeroy New took an unconventional approach to lighting and decorative table top pieces by using coiled, tubular wires. New called it the Polyp collection, referring to the cylindrical stalks of the sea creatures. Kalikasan, known for finely welded wires, executed the designs. “I’ve been dabbling one-offs and I’ve experimented with functional pieces,” said New. The original concept was to design elements based on the infinity symbol. “It evolved into connected loops,” he said. “This can be a candelabra, suspended light, chandelier and other things.” They have names such as “Gorgon,” “Cumulus” and “Polyp” pendant lamps which can be inverted. “There are many things you can do with wire,” he said. Asked the difference between art and designing for a commercial market, New replied, “It takes more problem solving in terms of the right design, how it works and capability for mass production. All these concerns have to be addressed. Unlike art or sculpture, you don’t care how it fits in a home.” In the past, Citem tapped designers with their companies. Now the veterans are guiding the young ones who are then partnered with major exporters. Layug said  the collaboration between the seasoned and young designers and the manufacturers
marked a very exciting time in Philippine design history. “The products have a very different aesthetic that is speaking to the new consumer,” concluded Booth. “The important aspect is that we deal with the macro trend. Then the buyers can come to FAME to select the products that fits into their color trends and merchandising themes. As a foreigner, this is what makes Manila FAME unique. It speaks with a global authority because it concentrates on the end consumer and on design.” Source: http://lifestyle.inquirer.net/96167/now-theyre-designing-furniture-and-accessories-for-the-millennials

Winners: Katha Awards March Edition

MANILA, Philippines - The Katha Awards was recently concluded last March 14, 2013, to mark the opening of the design and lifestyle event Manila FAME trade show at SMX Convention, Mall of Asia Complex. The Katha Awards is a special distinction presented to exporters and designers whose products embody exceptional quality and high-caliber design in furniture, houseware, fashion, gifts, accessories, and more. The Katha Awards is part of Design Week Philippines, a week-long celebration of design through various events and programs scheduled around the Manila FAME trade show. Here are the awards for the March Edition: Special Citation for Eco-design Awardee: Wataru Sakuma Piece: Takesu Hanging Lamp Best Booth Display Winner for March 2013 MCCA Industrial Corporation Katha Award for Product Design in Fashion Awardee: Anne Ong Katha Award for Home Design Awardee: Maricris Brias Product: Tree Bark for TADECO This edition of the Katha Awards was judged by Leo Almeria, prominent interior and houseware product designer; Isabel De Leon,Lifestyle Editor of the Manila Bulletin, Yvette Fernandez, Editor-in-chief of Town and Country Philippines and other esteemed prof...
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MANILA, Philippines - The Katha Awards was recently concluded last March 14, 2013, to mark the opening of the design and lifestyle event Manila FAME trade show at SMX Convention, Mall of Asia Complex. The Katha Awards is a special distinction presented to exporters and designers whose products embody exceptional quality and high-caliber design in furniture, houseware, fashion, gifts, accessories, and more. The Katha Awards is part of Design Week Philippines, a week-long celebration of design through various events and programs scheduled around the Manila FAME trade show. Here are the awards for the March Edition: Special Citation for Eco-design Awardee: Wataru Sakuma Piece: Takesu Hanging Lamp Best Booth Display Winner for March 2013 MCCA Industrial Corporation Katha Award for Product Design in Fashion Awardee: Anne Ong Katha Award for Home Design Awardee: Maricris Brias Product: Tree Bark for TADECO This edition of the Katha Awards was judged by Leo Almeria, prominent interior and houseware product designer; Isabel De Leon,Lifestyle Editor of the Manila Bulletin, Yvette Fernandez, Editor-in-chief of Town and Country Philippines and other esteemed professionals in the design industry. The Manila FAME trade show ended on Sunday, March 17. It will return to SMX Convention Center on October 17 to 20, 2013. - Rappler.com Source: http://www.rappler.com/life-and-style/24063-winners-katha-awards-march-edition

Local shapes global and global shapes local

Lowly GI sheets are shaped into cutesy mobiles; nylon fishing nets, woven with abaca, are turned into tapestry; intricate patterns on handmade paper are imprints of raindrops; turned balusters are made into chairs; and palm fronds become back rests. In the eyes of designers from the First World, Philippine products are superior not only because of the cultural tradition, but also for their ability to inspire or stir feelings. When American retail veteran James Booth was made project head of last week’s Manila FAME, he developed the concept “The Art of the Craftsman Equals the Soul of the Philippines.” That reflected his faith in our country. “I have been coming to the Philippines since 1978. Theirs is a truth that speaks through the product. That truth has deep roots in heritage and culture. It is a language all its own,” he said. “There is quality of execution of the design. This is where the care and delight come into the craftsman’s work.” In the pursuit of industrialization, First World countries have invariably divorced themselves from their indigenous capabilities. Although their designs have harnessed technology to improve lives, the soul is missing. I...
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Lowly GI sheets are shaped into cutesy mobiles; nylon fishing nets, woven with abaca, are turned into tapestry; intricate patterns on handmade paper are imprints of raindrops; turned balusters are made into chairs; and palm fronds become back rests. In the eyes of designers from the First World, Philippine products are superior not only because of the cultural tradition, but also for their ability to inspire or stir feelings. When American retail veteran James Booth was made project head of last week’s Manila FAME, he developed the concept “The Art of the Craftsman Equals the Soul of the Philippines.” That reflected his faith in our country. “I have been coming to the Philippines since 1978. Theirs is a truth that speaks through the product. That truth has deep roots in heritage and culture. It is a language all its own,” he said. “There is quality of execution of the design. This is where the care and delight come into the craftsman’s work.” In the pursuit of industrialization, First World countries have invariably divorced themselves from their indigenous capabilities. Although their designs have harnessed technology to improve lives, the soul is missing. In contrast, design in the Philippines has arrived, declared Booth. “It takes its lead from a wealth of design talent combined with a wealth of indigenous material. World exposure is refining more and more the authenticity of what the Philippines has to offer the design world.” The crux of Manila FAME were the works of Philippine-based and Filipino designers with international experience. They either collaborated with local manufacturers or worked in their own companies to use local material
s, inspired by native and natural themes, yet imbued with a contemporary flavor. A striking trend is the interaction with other cultures, as shown in the works of Japanese designer Wataru Sakuma who was elevated into the Katha Hall of Fame, the design awards given by the Center for International Trade Expositions and Missions (Citem). New York-based architect Calvin Tsao, a resource person in a forum, said, “Nations should find their own ground, welcome other thoughts, embrace them into their world. It’s cross-pollination.” Booth described this phenomenon of Eastern and Western influence as the result of globalization. “Because of technology and being connected 24/7, we are returning to our roots and heritage more and more today.  I call it ‘hyperlocalism’ where local shapes global and global shapes local. These two phenomena are continuing to intersect and create new values, returning to old values and shaping a world that becomes a village.” Raindrop patterns Working for the Japanese paper pulp company Masa Ecological Development Inc. (Masaeco) in Tagaytay, Sakuma earned his reputation for intricate designs interpreted in handmade paper.  Masaeco won the Best Booth in the Katha Awards for using recycled and sustainable materials in a simple but elegant way. The booth was made with old pieces of wood found near the factory and pedestals from recycled plywood that were covered with pulp paper. The company exhibited its signature pieces, such as patterned piña and banana screens, which created an interplay of textures. Sakuma’s other exhibit featured his signature salago paper, whose patterns were made from raindrops. The sheets were line
d like books to symbolize the unfolding story of Filipino craftsmanship. London-based industrial designer Daniel Latorre Cruz put up a workshop inspired by primitive western tools using local materials such as bamboo, buri and local lumber to make toys. “The shaving horse and pole lathe for wood turning were used by the Saxons. These tools were made from felled trees. It’s ideal for places where there is no electricity such as the mountains. They could be used here as they are self-sustaining,” he said. On top of the exhibit was a large lamp, inspired by pagodas in a temple, made from rattan with a burnished finish. The rug and pillow samples of New York-based designer Iñigo Elizalde  attracted foreign buyers for their strong geometric shapes and bold colors, evoking the jeepney motifs and patterns from ethnic textiles and the abel Iloko. Robert Alejandro elevated the lowly galvanized iron into playful mobiles using fine metal cutters. Commonly used for roofing, the GI sheets were transformed into the sun, moon, stars and kinetic birds that could be displayed in the garden. Paris-educated French-Filipina textile designer Olivia D’Aboville gained her reputation for transforming common objects such as cocktail stirrers and synthetic materials into images of sea life. She worked with local weavers who combined her signature materials of fishnet with abaca to produce sheer fabrics with unusual textures. The nylon threads of ropes used for fishing boats were incorporated into indigenous fibers to produce a panel with uneven edges. An abaca panel was woven with plastic straw that produced a three-dimension effect. For other manufacturers, she designed smoked c
apiz lamps that suggested fluidity or floating sea creatures. Bell jar lamps New York-based industrial designer Stanley Ruiz adopted the caravan as theme. He juxtaposed a wire-framed ox with  scaffolding (that was used to set up a booth) to display terra-cotta vases,  planters and resin stools with bold patterns and his rattan chairs designed for the American company Jonathan Adler. He elevated the cheap Monobloc chair into a chic item by covering it with black-lip pearl mosaic finishing. Ruiz’s award-winning log speakers made from pulp by Masaeco were ordered by Anthropologie store. Milo Naval’s lounge was furnished with pieces which he designed for other manufacturers using mahogany and engineered wood. It showed his signature as an interior designer—clean horizontal lines and natural finishes. As rattan was a trend in the ’80s and ’90s, Naval presented new uses and finishes for his retail line OMO. He produced hanging lighting fixtures covered with rattan sticks and sleek furniture finishes of the same material. Shaved coconut husks, traditionally made for polishing floors, adorned side tables. Ito Kish served as visual merchandising director and also focused on the Garden Pavilion. Although the Manila FAME’s theme was nationalistic, the pavilion presented a global world view with settings inspired by Britain, America, Asia and France. The pavilion presented the best of 28 manufacturers for outdoor decor. Kish’s booth made a statement on conservation by using salvaged wood, old lattices and architectural fragments and illustrations of iconic ancestral homes in Quiapo. Last FAME show, his chair, made from turned balusters, won the Katha award.
This time, the turned balusters were used in cabinets. His piece de resistance was the bell jar converted into a lamp. ‘Tropical moderne’ Budji + Royal Design Architects showcased its signature Tropical Moderne look, showcasing  Budji Layug’s furniture and collaborations with suppliers such as Maricris Brias and Luisa Robinson. It was all about neutral and earthy colors, mixing textures, using traditional wood in modern proportions and mixing with modern materials. The first setting showed a modern look—a streamlined bamboo sofa with narra burl side table and an occasional chair made of kamagong. High-backed chairs inspired by the ribs of a folding fan were done in steel. In the second setting, Layug focused on his signature bamboo look, exaggerating the proportions by using big bamboo pieces six inches in width and made into sectional sofas. Also featured was his signature X-shaped bamboo table with glass top. The exaggerated proportions made the user feel the sturdiness of bamboo. While most kamagong (Philippine ebony) furniture tend to warp over time, the four-poster bed with a ledge was covered with extra-thick wood to suggest solidity. Pratt-trained Cebuano designer Kenneth Cobonpue and other designer-collaborators presented the indoor-outdoor theme in a fun way. A cast resin coffee table doubled as planter; stone and resin four-legged vases and animal-shaped wall-mounted sconces and  D’Aboville’s sea anemone lamps made from cocktail stirrers made for a lively arrangement. People loved the palm frond chair and the braided chair inspired by Rapunzel. On the whole, Tsao lauded Manila FAME for the Filipino’s connection with its cultural roots
. “I go to Milan Furniture Fair and it’s about taste, elegance, industrial finishing and technological advancement. “In Paris’ Maison et Objets it’s about ‘finesse-ing.’ In New York, it’s a lot of intellectual thinking but they can’t make anything. There is no infrastructure to allow them to make it because America has moved to services and industry. The arts are gone. Here you can make it, you can think about it. There is so much creative energy here,” he said. “The 20th century was about industrialization. Although it facilitates greater efficiency, something is missing—the soul.  One thing that is still there is our sense of wanting a connection with people, nature and our own sensations. Industrialized countries have let go of their cultural heritage. Once that is gone, it’s hard to revive. However, the Philippines is still deeply connected to its cultural roots and its creative impulses.” Source: http://lifestyle.inquirer.net/72900/local-shapes-global-and-global-shapes-local

Three Global Trends featured at Manila FAME International

Three global design trends were highlighted for this edition of Manila FAME International and the products developed through Manila FAME International’s Merchandise Specialist Program in collaboration with international design specialists Michael Cleghorn and Linda Simpson were displayed in the Trend Stores. The Trend Stores are designed to reflect the interior setting of a typical retail shop so that it would give buyers an idea on how a particular product might look like when displayed in a retail store setting. The three trends are as follows: NATURALIST The naturalist trend feature products inspired by nature. The products developed for this trend mainly use neutral and earth colors. Raw and indigenous materials such as pandan, raffia, seagrass etc. were used in creating some of the products featured in this setting. Prompted by the regard for our environment the products featured in this setting utilize the various natural gifts of the Philippines. MOOD INDIGO This particular trend is inspired by the allure of the sea and intricate ikat patterns. Mood Indigo is a mixture of different hues/shades of blue. The products fea...
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Three global design trends were highlighted for this edition of Manila FAME International and the products developed through Manila FAME International’s Merchandise Specialist Program in collaboration with international design specialists Michael Cleghorn and Linda Simpson were displayed in the Trend Stores. The Trend Stores are designed to reflect the interior setting of a typical retail shop so that it would give buyers an idea on how a particular product might look like when displayed in a retail store setting. The three trends are as follows: NATURALIST The naturalist trend feature products inspired by nature. The products developed for this trend mainly use neutral and earth colors. Raw and indigenous materials such as pandan, raffia, seagrass etc. were used in creating some of the products featured in this setting. Prompted by the regard for our environment the products featured in this setting utilize the various natural gifts of the Philippines. MOOD INDIGO This particular trend is inspired by the allure of the sea and intricate ikat patterns. Mood Indigo is a mixture of different hues/shades of blue. The products featured in this setting are made of recycled and indigenous materials like raffia, bamboo, abalone, abaca, capiz and driftwood. GRAFFITI This particular trend is a burst of bright and vibrant colors. Inspired by the blend of pop-culture and self-expressionism this bold trend definitely stands out. Products featured in this setting have more of a modern/cosmopolitan look as compared to the previous trends still utilizing natural materials that are available in the Philippines
. All the products featured in the Trend Stores are especially developed by the following manufacturers under Manila FAME International’s Merchandise Specialist Program. Here’s the list of participating companies: 33 point 3 Exports, Inc. • Accent Pieces Exports, Inc. • Alice Blue Candle Inc. • Alriver Export Corp. • Anaware Ventures Inc. • Art ‘N’ Nature Mfg. Corp. • Asia Ceramics Corp. • Basket and Weaves • Betis Crafts Inc. • Bon-Ace Fashion Tools, Inc. • Calfurn Mfg. Philippines, Inc. • Catalina Embroideries, Inc. • Dekokraft Inc. • Ferimar Import-Export, Inc. • Gyrma International • Hacienda Crafts Company, Inc. • Indian Summer Gifts and Accessories • Joarene Fashion • Lightworks Resources, Inc. • Marléna Decor Craft • Mary Kel Company • MIL Export Philippines • Miles Ahead Corp. • Obra Cebuana, Inc. • Riviera Clay Philippines • Robles Heritage, Inc. • Saint Nicholas Crafts Inc. • Sally’s Crafts • San Jose Kitchen Cabinets • Sarilinlikha Novelties • Sebastianne Creations • Shell Arts Company, Inc. • Stanpuz Corp. • Starwood Manufacturing Company Inc. • TADECO, Inc. • Tamilee Industries • Venus Crafts • Triboa by Vivere Lifestyles Co. Inc. Source: https://manilafame.wordpress.com/2011/10/25/three-global-trends-featured-at-manila-fame-international/

Manila F.A.M.E. repositions brand with design-driven collaboration

Tadeco creates lavish contemporary motifs from coconut beads, applied to hand-woven t'nalak.  AT THE 53RD EDITION OF MANILA F.A.M.E. International, the opening ceremony marked the announcement that Manila Now, Cebu Next and Manila F.A.M.E. will unite as one trade show beginning in 2011 to reposition its global brand identity. "This strategic collaboration signifies a landmark accomplishment in the export industry and proof that we are serious and ready to do business with the world," said Department of Trade and Industry Secretary Gregory L. Domingo. "Using a total integrated approach, Manila F.A.M.E. International will further elevate its standards in becoming a national event with one voice, one image and one brand identity." In 2010, Philippine exports rose to $51 billion, according to Domingo, reaching the pre-recession level of 2007. Apparel and accessories ranked third, with woodcrafts and furniture coming in fourth. "This emerging recovery of the world market for home and lifestyle products puts the Center for International Trade Expositions and Missions in a stronger position to push Philippine exports at the forefront of the global market...
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Tadeco creates lavish contemporary motifs from coconut beads, applied to hand-woven t'nalak.  AT THE 53RD EDITION OF MANILA F.A.M.E. International, the opening ceremony marked the announcement that Manila Now, Cebu Next and Manila F.A.M.E. will unite as one trade show beginning in 2011 to reposition its global brand identity. "This strategic collaboration signifies a landmark accomplishment in the export industry and proof that we are serious and ready to do business with the world," said Department of Trade and Industry Secretary Gregory L. Domingo. "Using a total integrated approach, Manila F.A.M.E. International will further elevate its standards in becoming a national event with one voice, one image and one brand identity." In 2010, Philippine exports rose to $51 billion, according to Domingo, reaching the pre-recession level of 2007. Apparel and accessories ranked third, with woodcrafts and furniture coming in fourth. "This emerging recovery of the world market for home and lifestyle products puts the Center for International Trade Expositions and Missions in a stronger position to push Philippine exports at the forefront of the global marketplace," said CITEM Executive Director Rosvi Gaetos. "Through Manila F.A.M.E., we aim to showcase the originality and creativity of our Filipino artisans and industry as a whole, establishing our country as one of the world's design and lifestyle resource hubs." With about 300 exhibitors spotlighting the latest trends in home and fashion lifestyle, Manila F.A.M.E. offers a showcase of craftsmanship and artistry utilizing the republic's plentiful natural materials and traditional skills like int
ricate woodcarving. Curator Maja Olivares-Co was inspired by the country's rich resources of raw materials to create the show's theme: TM/New Directions, which focuses on three traditional, iconic materials - fiber, shell and wood - that are widely used in the Philip- pine handicraft industry. These materials represent not only the past and present of Filipino design history, but also the future in contemporary applications. These materials were repeated in nearly every booth throughout the show, translated with a deft hand in a wide-ranging lineup of product designs that managed to be fresh, modern and creative at once. Among the top materials were capiz (once used as part of windows), mother-of-pearl, abaca (also known as Manila hemp), buri, raffia and various Philippine woods. Manila F.A.M.E. also highlighted a dramatic exhibition of furniture and accessories from the Kagikan Project, a collaboration of five designers from EPOCH, whose designs were brought to life by various Cebu manufacturers. The five artists featured were Daniel Latorre- Cruz, a furniture and product designer based in London; Martha Cech, an industrial designer based in Vienna; Wataru Sakuma, a paper artist based in Manila; Jinggoy Buensuceso, a sculptor based in Singapore; and Stanley Ruiz, an industrial, furniture and product designer based in New York. The designs came across as both conceptual and contemporary with a hint of museum- exhibition edge. "The brief was not to follow a brief," said Latorre-Cruz, "but to create individual designs to show Filipino design can compete in a top-tier fashion." "More than a celebration of Filipino creativity and craftsmanship," Domingo said, "Manila F
.A.M.E. International is an homage to design and product innovations that are truly and uniquely Filipino." Source: http://www.homeaccentstoday.com/article/371357-manila-fame-repositions-brand-with-design-driven-collaboration

Katha Awards 2010

MANILA, Philippines - There are trade shows and there are trade shows. Af-ter seeing so many for two seasons every year for the past decade, it becomes more difficult to approach one with a fresh eye and spirit. So when CITEM’s Rhea Matute asked us to judge the Katha Awards for this season’s edition of Manila FAME International, we had to once again recondition ourselves to tackling this show like it was our first. How do you single out a product for excellence in creation (the name and inspiration of the award)? The guidelines seemed simple enough: originality, innovativeness, workmanship and functionality. But in an international setting, creation nowadays is quite a formidable task, a challenge that the show’s participants have to face every season in the wake of heightened competition from other trade fairs in the region. FAME, of course, has the pedigree, being the second longest-running show of its kind in the Asia Pacific region. The theme of the current show is “Evolution,” which is quite appropriate even for us on a personal note as we have grown with the show through the years, acted as merchandise consultants, and continue to source and collaborate wi...
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MANILA, Philippines - There are trade shows and there are trade shows. Af-ter seeing so many for two seasons every year for the past decade, it becomes more difficult to approach one with a fresh eye and spirit. So when CITEM’s Rhea Matute asked us to judge the Katha Awards for this season’s edition of Manila FAME International, we had to once again recondition ourselves to tackling this show like it was our first. How do you single out a product for excellence in creation (the name and inspiration of the award)? The guidelines seemed simple enough: originality, innovativeness, workmanship and functionality. But in an international setting, creation nowadays is quite a formidable task, a challenge that the show’s participants have to face every season in the wake of heightened competition from other trade fairs in the region. FAME, of course, has the pedigree, being the second longest-running show of its kind in the Asia Pacific region. The theme of the current show is “Evolution,” which is quite appropriate even for us on a personal note as we have grown with the show through the years, acted as merchandise consultants, and continue to source and collaborate with exporters. Each season is greeted with anticipation, searching for the next big thing as well as checking out how the established ones have reached new levels of innovation and refinement. Our first stop was the Holiday Décor section, which to the jaded eye can tend to look like just a mass of glitter, cookie- cutter ornaments, and resin Nativity sets. So what a surprise for us to find soft, tactile angels in handpainted stuffed canvas, something we’ve never seen before. The figures
were reminiscent of Chagall figures that floated in his celestial canvases but had a nostalgic charm that brings all the warm thoughts that Christmas is associated with. And the fact that you want to touch them for a reassuring squeeze makes them all right for the holidays in any part of the world. Next came a table filled with the most adorable handpainted figures: marching band members with cymbals, trumpets and horns, all atop a drum; the three kings and a choir of angels. Standard Christmas subjects, really, till we realized they were made from bowling pins! “My inspiration was actually the Russian matryoshka dolls that I found so pretty,” related Salvacion Novero of Sally’s Crafts, based in Los Baños, Laguna. “I said to myself, I could do something as good as that! Then I was inspired by the shape of the bowling pin and its curves so I thought, why not make them into Christmas dolls?’” Pauline Juan, editor of Preview magazine and another KATHA judge, had finds that we missed. There was a Nativity set carved out of light wood in a cubist style. Very spare and modern for those who want their holidays without the frills and glitter. The ornaments she found also turned out to be the winner for holiday decor: animal ornaments by Philippine Fine Crafts in eco-friendly, abaca bristles, biodegradable down to the seed eye details. Never did Christmas with a conscience look this gorgeous. Architect Joey Yupangco, another judge, discovered a product that won a special citation: Team International’s nifty “Make Your Own Card Kits,” which makes holiday cards more personal with the creativity and touch of the hand of the giver. Home furniture
and decoration, which has the most number of participants was harder to navigate with all the choices. But together with Joey Yupangco, we were unanimous in choosing as winner the wire hanging lamps of Wataru Sakuma done in collaboration with Celia Jiao of Kalikasan Crafts. The lamps had a fresh, new shape like a computer-generated, angular version of crumpled paper. It turns out that the Japanese designer with a fine arts background has been the design star for the past two seasons, winning awards for products he has designed for various exporters. He also designed a red armchair and beige stools in tinalak fiber for Tadeco, which look like spools of ribbons ready to be unwound. The wonderful thing is that they sit well, giving a nice, resilient bounce. His special setting tea-house and booth for Masa Ecological Development were also nominees for booth design with their clean lines of coco lumber structures and walls of crystal-patterned cut-out paper made from lumber sawdust. Highly commendable as well and winner of a Katha citation was Arden Classic’s line of table accoutrements using shells and ostrich eggs with silver-plated cast brass using the tedious lost wax method. In the spirit of Renaissance and Baroque kunstkammer pieces, like those in the collection of Yves St. Laurent, these jewels are definite collectibles. We saw similar pieces at Lane Crawford, which happens to be Arden’s client. “I was always attracted to these pieces that I would see at museums in Europe like the Hermitage in St. Petersburg and decided to develop my own,” relates proprietor Jen Siarot. We remember her pieces when she just opened a few years ago in Cebu. There w
ere coco shell bowls with cast legs in simple scroll patterns available at hotel boutiques. Now she’s definitely in the big league with very intricate pieces that have reached a whole new level of refinement. Good news is that she’s opening a store soon at Greenbelt 5! The winner for booth design went to Mind Masters, designed by Tess Pasola, who must be one of the Philippines’ most talented and prolific product designers. Aside from her now iconic and heavily-copied James Bound series of vases and bowls made from bound book leaf paper which she designed for her own company, she has created for other companies many other objects which you will find in the best design stores around the world. Using a backdrop of corrugated galvanized iron, she had colorful, graphic message boards appliquéd with photoprinted tarpauline.   There was the riot of comics patterns, yet the look was so controlled with the squares neatly lining the walls. For furniture, there were witty rectangular block tables with tarpaulin covers that had prints of the dining china and cutlery. In the fashion section, Mich Dulce, wearing one of her fabulous hats, giddily related her meeting English punk rock icon Adam Ant. Her training in London and quirky design sense have made her hats and corsets the most covetable fashion pieces. For this show, she had chic hats in bright tinalak displayed on “Bambi” hat stands. Nearby, we discovered a new variation on the recycled juice packets: Strips were bundled together and belted to create the bilbil bags, reminding you to go on a diet to get rid of your muffin top waist. Joey Yupangco found bags made of multicolored plastic bottle caps whic
h were punctured to give an op-art pattern. Emi Jorge exhibited the most beautiful minaudieres in kamagong, shell, and mother-of- pearl with handsculpted details like octopus tentacles. Pauline Juan was fascinated with a bag made from tinalak woven by a T’boli of Lake Sebu in Mindanao. What was most unusual was that it was in a new color combination and weave which isn’t normally done without sanction from one’s ancestors. How does the weaver know that her ancestors are displeased? She gets sick. So far, this particular weaver was all right, which means her ancestors are fine with her fashion innovation. Source: http://www.philstar.com/modern-living/2010/10/23/623143/from-chagall-to-st-laurent

Pride Of Place (Philippine Tatler)

Maricris Brias Hosts an intimate lunch for six and shows off the spirit of the Filipino in her Home. The Charming hostess, Maricris Floirendo Brias, of southern gentility, recently held an intimate lunch for a few close friends at her beautifully designed home in Makati City. They were eager to see her award-winning home accessories that she has been exporting worldwide. As the guests arrived, they were first greeted by the soothing sound of water trickling into a pond where bright red koi popped their heads out in curiosity. Once inside, everyone raved about the well-designed and spacious home.